Magnesium & Sleep

Trouble falling asleep?  Magnesium plays four central roles in your sleep, and magnesium deficiency is heavily linked with major sleep disorders. On this page:

  1. Magnesium relaxes the body before sleep.
  2. Magnesium reduces and prevents sleep disorders.
  3. Magnesium regenerates your body and improves memory during sleep.
  4. Magnesium helps maintain a healthy biological clock (sleep cycle).
  5. Solutions to improving your sleep.
Learn More

Magnesium & Sleep

Trouble falling asleep?  Magnesium has four central roles in your sleep, and magnesium deficiency is heavily linked with major sleep disorders. On this page:

  1. Magnesium relaxes the body before sleep.
  2. Magnesium reduces and prevents sleep disorders.
  3. Magnesium regenerates your body and improves memory during sleep.
  4. Magnesium helps maintain a healthy biological clock (sleep cycle).
  5. Solutions to improving your sleep.
Let's Dive In!

1. Magnesium relaxes the body before sleep:

2. Magnesium reduces and prevents sleep disorders:

3. Magnesium promotes youth, recovery & memory during sleep:

4. Magnesium maintains a healthy biological clock (sleep cycle):

5. Solutions to help improve your sleep:

++ Scientific References

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